I’ve had the idea for these cabled socks in my notebook for a while, and with the imminent completion of the Textured Socks, I wanted to start something new. I sketched out the overs and unders, decided which round would be the first one, and had a moment of pride for remembering that cables take up some of the fabric and make the socks fit more tightly. The general rule is to look at the row or round with the most cable crossovers, and add one stitch per crossover to the total amount. Since my usual socks are knit at 64 stitches, and these will have one round with eight crosses, I decided to start with 72.

Step One: Cast on 72 stitches, using the stretchy slipknot cast-on. Discover that the yarn is frayed to breaking. Slide 72 stitches off the needle; discard yarn.

Step Two: Grumble a little.

Step Three: Cast on 57 stitches before discovering another frayed spot. Slide 57 stitches off the needle; discard yarn. Inspect frayed end and decide that it doesn’t look nibbled, at least.

Step Four: Grumble a little more, using slightly stronger language. Ponder the options of either throwing the ball of yarn across the room, or bringing it home so that it can be rewound into a centre-pull ball, looking for more frayed spots along the way.

Step Five: Decide to try it once again. Cast on 72 stitches. Slide the next ten yards of yarn through fingers. Determine that there are no further frayed spots, and that the ball of yarn must have gotten pinched in a tote or something.

Step Six: Knit twenty rounds of k2, p2 ribbing. (Take some time, twelve rounds in, to wonder if a 1×1 twisted rib might not look better with the planned 3×1 ribbing for the sock. Decide that 2×2 is stretchier, anyway. Keep going.)

Step Seven: Ask boyfriend to mix a drink that matches the sock.

Step Eight: Choose a name for the new design. (It’s “Cabled Violets” for the moment, but it won’t stay that way forever. Suggestions are welcome!)

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A very kind Raveler sent me a bit of their leftover yarn so that I could finish the Textured Socks. So finally, almost a year after I started them, they are done! Hooray!

I used the free Stanton pattern and just over one skein of Socks that Rock Lightweight in the Smokey Mountain Morn colourway. The pattern was well-written and easy to follow, though I made a few adjustments: lengthening the toe slightly and widening the heel turn. I chose to keep the stitch pattern down the back of the heel flap, but slipped the first stitch on every row to make picking up the gusset easier. The stitch pattern is quickly memorized, and gives a good all-over texture that adds interest to the spirals of this variegated yarn. It draws in a bit like ribbing, so these socks should fit snugly.

Apparently Socks that Rock Lightweight now comes in a larger skein than when I bought this yarn – 405 yards instead of 360. The price has gone up to match, but at least if I decide to use the yarn again, I’ll have a better chance of getting a whole pair of socks out of one skein.

One of the older, smaller skeins is still in my stash, in the “Moss Agate” colourway. If anyone wants to buy it from me, I’ll send it on. $23 includes shipping anywhere in the continental United States; I’ll have to do the math on postage to other countries. It’s quite pretty but now I know from experience that it just won’t make socks big enough for me.

Comments Comments Off on In Which the Pirate Finally Finishes.

Ten years ago on a motorcycle ride through the countryside with my ex, we stopped at a little yarn shop called Needles in the Haymarket, and I bought a ball of pink and gray Austermann Step yarn. I didn’t know, then, that less than a year after that ride I would be moving to Haymarket, and that shop would become my LYS for years!

Four years ago I cast on for another pair of Jaywalkers. I liked the yarn well enough, but for some reason I never felt the urge to knit on the socks. I’d take the project out from time to time and put a few rounds onto it, but didn’t fall in love with it. When I was traveling last fall, I thought of bringing it – but no, I started something else instead.

At the end of the weekend I said to myself, “Self, it’s time to finish that sock. Or something.” So I tried it on to see how much more I’d need to knit before the toe and… it didn’t fit. My feet have grown. I’ve put on some muscle in my legs since I started biking and running. And this sock is never going to fit.

Farewell, Pink Jaywalker. It was nice almost knowing you.

Hello, Austermann Step in pinks and grays. What kind of sock do you think you’d like to be?

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The pillow form arrived during the first weekend of the Tour, and I used some leftover handspun Jacob in a medium gray shade to crochet the two sides together. I’m really pleased with the finished product! My original thought had been to make a felted pillow, but I liked the feel of the fabric – and the size – so I just left it alone. It’s heavy and squooshy and comfortable, and looks great on the black leather couch – though its final home will probably be on the futon in my office. This project was fun from start to finish; I got a lot better at longdraw spinning and then it was such a good feeling to knit a quick and easy project with my own handspun yarn on big needles.

The first week of the Tour went well, and then I crashed – but I’ll write about that next time. Meanwhile, I’m playing yarn chicken with the socks I started last fall, and I think it’s a losing game. I’d anticipated this, so when I grafted the first toe shut I didn’t pull the stitches tight. If I have to rip out that toe for the extra yarn I will, and then both socks will be given contrasting purple toes. Not what I’d hoped for, but that’s how it goes sometimes.

The safety pins on each sock are keeping the rows lined up, so I don’t have to count over and over again to get my socks the same length. This is Socks that Rock lightweight in the Smokey Mountain Morn colourway, and it’s the second STR pair I’ve made that isn’t going to cover my toes. (I made these shorter though! and with fewer stitches around! Hrmph.) I have one more skein of the yarn and I’ll remember next time to just make contrasting cuffs/heels/toes…

Meanwhile, I’ve been super busy! I bought a new (slightly used, but new to me) car and sold my old car last weekend, then started a new job on Monday, and I’m excited about both those things – but so drained from having two adventures in one week. Last night when it was still too early to go to bed, but I was too tired to do anything that required any mental effort, I pulled out some Lang Jawoll sock yarn that a friend sent me. She’d somehow made a tangled mess of the skeins without ever knitting any of it… but now they’re all detangled, wound into loose cakes, and added to my Ravelry stash.

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I’d set myself the goal of finishing both sides of this rainbow pillow before the Tour de Fleece begins, and I made it by just a few hours – and a few yards of yarn short, which is totally okay. I slipped in a few rows of gray, also handspun, that I plan to use to edge and seam up the sides anyway.

A pillow form has been ordered and it shouldn’t take too long to finish this up once it arrives. Meanwhile, I can start the Tour tomorrow morning with a clean conscience!

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How many divisions to make? In what direction? How do I get that small amount of aqua spread out as much as possible without losing it? The irony of considering, for more than a minute or two, where to draw the line between “thinking” and “overthinking” wasn’t lost on me. So I cast aside all those thoughts and split each four-ounce piece of fibre into 16 pieces. Here they all are:

(That yellow one towards the left side sure does confuse my camera.) Now I’ll take one piece from each of those piles to make sixteen little bundles from which to spin, in order to evenly distribute the different fibres around the whole project. The plan is to spin a worsted weight yarn, but to help me decide whether to go for a two-ply or three-ply, I wrote up the pros and cons:

Pros of a two-ply: more yardage, more distinct colours
Cons of a two-ply: possibly less even, kind of bumpy

Pros of a three-ply: more blended colours, more rounded/even yarn
Cons of a three-ply: less yardage

Once I realized that “more blended colours” meant “less likely to get splotches or pools of bright yellow” the decision was pretty clear: three-ply it is!

I just have to try to resist starting this project until the beginning of the Tour…

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After a variety of fibre is selected, the next step of a Combo Spin is to unbraid/unfold it all, split it up into smaller pieces, and then evenly distribute those pieces. This is two pounds of wool (with a little bit of silk and bamboo in the mix) unbraided onto my dining room table. It was interesting to feel the differences from one braid to the next – this one is softer, that one is more compacted, this one is thicker, that one is less solid.

In this video from the PassioKnit Spinner, she explains her method for splitting up her fibre: first she divides it into eight pieces the short way, then strips each of those pieces in half the long way. For four-ounce pieces of fibre, that comes out to sixteen quarter-ounce pieces – a pretty good distribution!

Half of the fibre I’ve chosen is tonal or evenly variegated, so it doesn’t matter if I split them up the short way or the long way. They’ll be pretty much the same, short or long. Since I find it easier to spin from thicker chunks of fibre, especially if I’m going to be spinning longdraw from the fold, I’m going to break these up the short way. Here’s a picture of those pieces so you can see what I mean (the stripy one on the left is eight ounces; the burgundy and yellow ones are four ounces each):

For the rest of the fibre, however, it *does* matter. I refolded each of the four pieces of top to find the colour repeat. In this one, each colour only appears four times. If I divide it only the short way, I’ll have longer runs of each colour that appear less frequently. The more times I strip it the long way, the more times each colour will appear throughout the entire project.

It was fun to find the repeats! Some of them were very clear:

But some had a couple of places that didn’t quite fit in with the colour pattern:

I’m not going to overthink it (too much); I’m just going to start splitting it up with the intent of even distribution. I can imagine that bright aqua colour in little subtle lines throughout, or in longer runs in fewer spots, but it’s sure to look good either way!

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I used this rainbow of Corriedale to practice my longdraw spinning, getting even better acquainted with “Persistence,” the 30″ Schacht-Reeves, in the process. (Goodness, I am in love with this wheel.) I split each colour into four even pieces so that I could have two two-ply rainbows.

By the end of the spin (10 ounces/285g or so) I felt like I was getting the hang of spinning from the fold, and eventually I came up with 368 yards of two-ply yarn. The full rainbow wouldn’t quite fit on one bobbin, so I spun half and half. The plying was done on “Grace,” the Sonata, because she’s got a jumbo flyer. Twice, the two bobbins I was plying together matched up perfectly, both in the length of each colour stripe and in the total length of yarn. I love when that happens! The other two times, I had to fudge a little bit.

One of the blue-to-purple bobbins got a little out of order, too. I’m sure it will be just fine in the end, but I’m disappointed that I didn’t catch the mistake before it was too late.

When I first started the spin, I had all kinds of thoughts about what project to make with this stuff, and eventually decided on something quick and easy: a pillow! I decided to knit corner-to-corner to get it as close to square as possible while still using up all of the yarn, and used my little kitchen scale to determine the halfway point. It’s right here in the greens:

I’m considering the possibility of felting this once it’s done, but it’s knitting up far more evenly than I’d expected. I chose US 9/5.5mm needles and I’m pleased with the overall feel and drape of the fabric. Once both sides are finished, I’ll crochet them together with a wide-ish border, probably in black.

The next question is, am I going to spin the Tour de Fleece project the same way? The same thickness? The same two-ply? There are so many options!

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The Tour de FranceFleece begins in just under seven weeks, so I thought it would be prudent to finish a project I began with the momentum of last year’s Tour. Eight ounces of BFL from Three Waters Farm in the “Stone House” colourway is now 580 (!) yards of two-ply fingering weight yarn.

Next up, I’m going to spin that rainbow of Corriedale on the Schacht-Reeves so that I can practice longdraw and spinning from the fold, which is my plan for the big Tour sweater-quantity spin. (Hopefully I can get to a good level of consistency in the next few weeks.) I’m going to split each bit of colour in half, then spin them on separate bobbins to be plied back together. If my spinning isn’t exactly even, that will lead to some good blending from one shade to the next.

(Then I’ll have to figure out what to do with ten ounces of rainbow yarn…)

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In my last installment of “As The Carder Turns” I was wondering how heavy I could make a batt, and the answer is 70 g (just under 2.5 ounces) of Corriedale. I really packed it on, and I’m really pleased with how it looks – even if my camera really has trouble accurately capturing pinks and purples.

“Wouldn’t it be neat, though,” I said to myself, “if I split this in half and carded a good amount of silk into it?” So I did, at least for one of the halves.

Of course, sending it through the carder several more times with a bunch of white silk muted and homogenized the colours. The next “wouldn’t it be neat, though…” is spinning each one and then plying them together!

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