For the past hour or so I have been spinning up the orange bits (mostly) of the roving that I bought at the MD Sheep and Wool Festival back in May. When it gets to be daylight again I’ll take a picture of my progress – there is just no way I can get a good shot at this hour of night. The roving has seven million colors in it (okay, five) and four of those five go together very nicely. There’s blue, purple, magenta-ish, green… and bright orange. So I’m experimenting by pulling out the magenta and orange and spinning them together first. Then I’ll spin the other colors. Since there’s probably half as much orange as other colors, I’m thinking a three-ply kinda thing might work out well. I know that means I’ll get less total yardage, but I’m also hoping it might even out some of the slubby spots.

Conclusions I have reached from this evening’s exercise:

  1. Draft first, then spin.
  2. Drop spindles are slow.
  3. I want a spinning wheel.
  4. I cannot have a spinning wheel until I have a house to put it in.
    • Note to self: Buy house.
  5. A third and fourth hand would be incredibly useful.

Questions I have accumulated:

  1. When the spindle is full (or not spinning so well anymore) what do I do with the singles? I guess I can wind them into tiny little balls.
  2. The single is not nearly long enough to be useful. Does plying take care of this, or will I be stuck with lots of very short skeins of yarn?
  3. What if I just *wanted* a single? Is this where I’d really need a wheel instead of a spindle? Good thing I don’t really want a single out of this, right? Yeah.
  4. What the hell have I gotten myself into?

Way too much fun, I tells ya. Way too much fun.

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One Response to “In Which the Pirate Finally Spins.”
  1. Janis says:

    I’ve been storing my singles on toilet paper rolls. I’ve got my jury-rigged plying setup, so I just slip the roll on the PVC pipes and it’s ready for plying.

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